lunch at the eyeful lake, long-neck women, phaung daw oo paya & the aung puppet show

Monday, February 23:  At around noon, we head to the Eyeful Lake Restaurant for lunch.

Heading to the Eyeful Restaurant for lunch

Heading to the Eyeful Lake Restaurant for lunch

I have some lovely views of the activity on the lake from the open air restaurant.

view from the Eyeful Restaurant

view from the Eyeful Lake Restaurant

The restaurant is quite lovely, but I have to say that what I ordered wasn’t anything special.  I had sea bass with cashew nuts; the fish was very strong-smelling and overcooked.

Eyeful Restaurant

Eyeful Lake Restaurant

I did however enjoy the crunchy appetizer with its dipping sauce.

Appetizers

Appetizers

Sea bass with cashew nuts

Sea bass with cashew nuts

I enjoy watching the activity on the lake.  The locals seem to always be harvesting grass or weeds.  At first I didn’t know why they were doing this, whether they were just weeding their floating gardens or putting the weeds to some use.  Later, I find that farmers gather up lake-bottom weeds from the deeper parts of the lake, bring them back in boats and make them into floating beds in their garden areas, anchored by bamboo poles. These gardens rise and fall with changes in the water level, and so are resistant to flooding. The constant availability of nutrient-laden water results in these gardens being incredibly fertile (Wikipedia: Inle Lake).

view from the Eyeful Restaurant

view from the Eyeful Lake Restaurant

view from the Eyeful Restaurant

view from the Eyeful Lake Restaurant

view from the Eyeful Restaurant

an eyeful from the Eyeful Lake

view from the Eyeful Restaurant

view from the Eyeful Lake Restaurant

leaving the Eyeful Restaurant

leaving the Eyeful Lake Restaurant

Finally, we take off from the Eyeful Lake Restaurant and head somewhere else.  It’s fun on this voyage because I never really know where I’m going; I just put myself into the boatman’s hands. Wherever he drops me ends up being a delightful experience.

Inn Than Lay-2 Restaurant

Inn Than Lay-2 Restaurant

long-tail boats on Inle Lake

long-tail boats on Inle Lake

We take the wide channel north to Tha Lay, where we make a stop at Phaung Daw Oo Paya, the holiest religious site in southern Shan State.

going through another village

going through another village

Phaung Daw Oo Paya is a huge tiered pagoda.

pagoda along the lakeshore

pagoda along the lakeshore

floating gardens

floating gardens

Phaung Daw Oo Paya

Phaung Daw Oo Paya

The center shrine in the main hall of Phaung Daw Oo Pagoda houses five small golden Buddha images. The Buddha images have been covered with so many gold leaves that it is impossible to see their original structure (Inle Lake Tourism: Phaung Daw Oo Pagoda).  Only men are allowed to apply the gold leaves.

Phaung Daw Oo Paya

Phaung Daw Oo Paya

Phaung Daw Oo Paya

Phaung Daw Oo Paya

Phaung Daw Oo Paya

Phaung Daw Oo Paya

Phaung Daw Oo Paya

Phaung Daw Oo Paya

"Ladies are Prohibited"

“Ladies are Prohibited”

Phaung Daw Oo Paya

Phaung Daw Oo Paya

leaving Phaung Daw Oo Paya

leaving Phaung Daw Oo Paya

We take off from the pagoda and head into the town of Heyar Yawrma, passing long tail boats loaded with cargo.

carrying cargo on Inle Lake

carrying cargo on Inle Lake

At Heyar Yawrma, which is one of the more developed towns for tourism on the lake, we stop at a silver shop, where I can’t resist buying a silver necklace!

silversmith

silversmith

silver forging

silver forging

Then we go into a weaving shop run by the Kayan (Padaung) Tribe.  The Padaung are best known for its women who wear brass rings around their necks, arms and legs. They are often known as the long-neck women of Myanmar. The brass coils are first applied when the girls are about five years old, and as the girl grows older, longer coils are added. The weight of the brass pushes down the collar-bone and compresses the rib cage, making their necks appear very long (Asia Explorers: Padaung People).  There are many legends associated with this practice, one being that it made the women ugly so they wouldn’t fall prey to human trafficking.  One other legend is that a tribe leader had a dream where a tiger attacked children born on a Wednesday and broke their necks; as his daughter was born on a Wednesday, he started this practice. 

long-neck woman weaving

long-neck woman weaving

Girls start to wear the necklaces at age five. The more laces are worn, the longer their necks are. A female adult may have up to 35 necklaces; they can’t take them off or their neck will be easily broken. The Padaung consider the longer neck they have, the more elegant they are. Unlike any women in the world, the Padaung long neck women are happy with their special “fashion” (Exotic Voyages: Long Neck Tribe in Inle Lake).

long-neck woman

long-neck woman

I can’t imagine living day-to-day wearing these brass necklaces without a break, or not being able to take them off at night while sleeping.  I would think the women would be miserable, much like the Chinese women who had their feet bound.

weaving

weaving

long-neck young woman

long-neck young woman

I can’t help but take a picture of this tourist trying on one of the hats in the shop.

a tourist tries on a hat

a tourist tries on a hat

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

another shrine in Heyar Yawrma

We leave the town of Heyar Yawrma and head back into the open lake.  Here I see more locals and tourists and fishermen buzzing around the lake.

locals cruising the lake

locals cruising the lake

stilt homes

stilt homes

restaurant on the lake

restaurant on the lake

The iconic image found at Inle Lake is that of the local fishermen with their conical nets and their distinctive rowing style; this involves standing at the stern on one leg and wrapping the other leg around the oar. This unique style evolved for the reason that the lake is covered by reeds and floating plants making it difficult to see above them while sitting. Standing provides the rower with a view beyond the reeds. However, the leg rowing style is only practiced by the men (Wikipedia: Inle Lake).

making a living

making a living

fisherman

fisherman

fisherman

fisherman

fisherman

fisherman

Fisherman on Inle Lake

Fisherman on Inle Lake

Fisherman on Inle Lake

Fisherman on Inle Lake

We return to Nyaungshwe at around 3:00.  I’ve been out and about the lake since before dawn.  I return to my room, where I take a nap.  Later, I rent a bicycle for $1 and go to Lin Htett Myanmar Food, which has been recommended.  I have vegetable curry with accompaniments.  I think the serving is meant for a crowd; I can eat only a small portion of the meal.

Dinner at Lin Htett Myanmar Food in Nyaungshwe

Dinner at Lin Htett Myanmar Food in Nyaungshwe

Lin Htett Myanmar Food

Lin Htett Myanmar Food

view from Lin Htett Myanmar Food

view from Lin Htett Myanmar Food

street view from Lin Htett Myanmar Food

street view from Lin Htett Myanmar Food

street scenes from Lin Htett Myanmar Food

street scenes from Lin Htett Myanmar Food

vegetable curry with accompaniments

vegetable curry with accompaniments

Stuffed, I then go to the Aung Puppet Show at 7:00.  We are locked into a small space to watch the show, and I can’t help but feel a little claustrophobic.  The puppets do several song and dance routines for about a half-hour.

Aung Puppet Show

Aung Puppet Show

Aung Puppet Show

Aung Puppet Show

Aung Puppet Show

Aung Puppet Show

Aung Puppet Show

Aung Puppet Show

the puppeteer at the Aung Puppet Show

the puppeteer at the Aung Puppet Show

Aung Puppet Show

Aung Puppet Show

I’m pretty exhausted after the puppet show, so I go back to my room to call it a night.  Tomorrow, I’ll ride my bicycle around town to check out the Mingala Market and take another boat to Inthein.

 

Advertisements
Categories: Asia, Aung Puppet Show, Eyeful Lake Restaurant, Heyar Yawrma, Inle Apex Hotel, Inle Lake, Long neck women, Myanmar, Nyaungshwe, Padaung Tribe, Phaung Daw Oo Paya, Shan State, Travel | Tags: , , , , | 4 Comments

Post navigation

4 thoughts on “lunch at the eyeful lake, long-neck women, phaung daw oo paya & the aung puppet show

  1. Those last shots of the fisherman on the lake are beautiful, Cathy. 🙂 I was interested to read about the floating islands and the nutrients. That young girl with the collar looks very happy and the older ones do look elegant, but It can’t be comfortable, can it?

    • Thanks so much, Jo. Those floating gardens were really amazing, as were the fishermen and those long-neck ladies. You’re right in that they do look elegant, but very uncomfortable as well. 🙂

  2. I love that sign ‘No Ladies’ Glad they didn’t spell it with a double d. That would have caused amazing confusion. I find the long necks grotesque. We had them in northwest Thailand too.

  3. What at full on day Cathy and a fascinating one. I’ve seen those women on tv, it’s one of the most bizarre practices anywhere isn’t it? Interesting to rad the story of how it was supposed to have begun. I wonder how they can breathe and just imagine what their skeleton is like.

I'd love hear your comments & start a conversation! :-)

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Megadiverse Piedmont

Farming an acre in the Upper Wolf Island Creek subwatershed in the Roanoke River basin.

Ravi'S Blog

Java Fever

John SterVens' Tales

Thee Life, Thee Heart, Thee Tears

Set SerenDestiny in Motion

"Lead the Life You're Meant to Live"

Romancing Reality

Linda Grashoff's Photography Adventures

Jill's Scene

A small town take on the big, wide world

eatprayjade

eating and traveling in pursuit of la dolce vita

Japan Wonders

Exploring Japan's popular tourist spots and off-the-beaten path

A lot from Lydia

You can learn a lot from Lydia...(It's a song, not a promise.)

Ink Arts by Carol

My site for offering my alcohol ink arts

I see Beauty everyday

Blessed be the ones that see beauty where others see nothing

BOOKING IT

Debra's Excellent Adventures in Reading and Travel

Marsha Ingrao

Traveling & Blogging Near and Far

PIRAN CAFÉ

Notebooks from a trampfest. Travel tips, tales and images, online since 2006.

Word Wabbit

Wrestless Word Wrestler

Cardinal Guzman

Encyclopedia Miscellaneous - 'quality' blogging since August 2011

Pit's Fritztown News

A German Expat's Life in Fredericksburg/Texas

%d bloggers like this: